Landmarks

“I myself have never been able to find out precisely what feminism is; I only know that people call me a feminist whenever I express sentiments that differentiate me from a doormat.” -Rebecca West

Although Sociology 101 may prove to be the most miserable class in existence, it did at least provide me with a decent quote. In America today, gender equality is not a huge issue. Some people may make it seem a larger problem than it actually is, for the mere purpose of causing a fuss. I know in my own dating relationship, I point out that I am capable for paying for dinner on occasion. I take insults to womankind somewhat personally, but I know they are usually jokes. Really, it’s more difficult to be in the reigning majority nowadays. Minorities are placed on pedestals; they are given anything to ease their journey in life. Women are not exactly minorities, but up until recently they faced gigantic obstacles to overcome being considered anything less than equal to their male counterparts.

For me personally, I’m okay with the typical female stereotype. I don’t plan on going to any field where women are unwelcome. In fact, I’d rather be a “homemaker.” I want a family, and I want to be there for my family. I’ve always been a kid person. Once I get into my chosen career path, I may change my mind on the “homemaking.” I’m going into pediatric speech pathology, though I have a long road ahead of me. Although I’m technically a sophomore in credit hours, I still consider myself a freshman. The amount of study ahead of me is daunting. I am double majoring in Communication Disorders and Psychology, so I have to fit all that coursework into four years of undergraduate school. After that, I must complete my master’s degree to even be able to practice speech therapy. It’ll be a long road.

I’ve been through the typical developmental landmarks people of my age have experienced. I may be eighteen and “legal,” but I don’t feel much different than I did at sixteen, or even fourteen. However, I’m seeing friends get engaged, dive into careers, and become real “adults.” Observing all the changes around me is slightly disconcerting. Two years ago, or even last year, when we talked of marriage it was in the distant future, a vague, glittering concept far out of reach. Now, adulthood is all too imminent. I’m certainly not self-sufficient. I rely on my parents for monetary support, as well as every other type of support parents provide. I sometimes think I’m ready to be on my own, living out my life, but then I realize just how fragile I am. I’m not an adult. I’m still a child. I still have much to learn.

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